Domaine De Jourdanet 1986 Bas Armagnac.This 1986 posses a deep amber color. The aromas that emerge from this spirit are masculine with prune, leather, and roasted almonds. On the palate this has an impressive texture with lovely elements of pepper and spice that are joined by the elements mentioned in the nose. The finish is long and broad, making this a tipple for cool nights. D&M Tasting Notes

 

Monclar d’Armagnac, a tiny town near the Gers/Landes border. It is but a speck on a local map and its center, once a hub of activity, is nearly empty now. The town is so small that Google Maps is not quite certain where it is in relation to that buzzing metropolis of Cauzabon, home to 1,651 souls. Surrounding the town are miles of fields, empty and foggy during the winter months, but full of yellow, green and golden colors extending over the rolling hillside during the summer. Here in Monclar, people complain about the heat in the summer, and the humidity levels that rise with each passing hour in afternoon. Occasionally the heat will break, and a tumultuous storm will pass through the area for a quarter of an hour or so, cutting the moist thickness for the next couple of days and enabling residents to sleep more easily in their non-air-conditioned homes.

Michel Cazade is a third generation farmer that lives along the main road between Cazaubon and Labastide d’Armagnac on the outskirts of Montclar. Michel, like many of his local farmer peers, is a polyculturalist, and his 42 acre farm includes a variety of grains, sunflowers and most important for us: grapes. In his small rustic barn, he makes wine from his grapes in the fall, most of which he sells in bulk to the cooperative down the road. Nowadays that wine destined for the cooperative is made from Ugni Blanc and Colombard, but he still has a five acre plot of Baco 22-A, the grape which made Armagnac’s reputation between the 1920s and 1980s

The history of Baco has been marked by controversy due to its non-Gallic origins. Baco 22-A is a hybrid-grape that was developed after the phylloxera scourge ravaged the vineyards of Gascony. It is a cross of Noah (of Labrusca descent) from upstate and Folle Blanche (of Vinifera descent) native to France. Baco was named after the scientist that created it, François Baco. The grape flourished in plantings and acreage as it was resistant to disease and thrived in the Gascony region, giving Armagnacs with plenty of plummy aromas and a rich texture. This run of success seemed to be brought to an end in the late-nineties. The governing board of vineyards or the AOC committee (Appellation des Origines Controlée) decided that no hybrid grapes would be allowed in areas that had an appellation, of which Armagnac was one. It was determined that if Armagnac was to keep its appellation status, the Baco vines would have to go. Of course this caused an groundswell of discontent in the region, as a good percentage of the Gascon vineyards were planted with Baco. After much debate, a compromise was reached and the AOC committee decided to allow Baco to remain, but only to become a distilled product, rather than be transformed into table wine. Because of this compromise, Armagnac remains the only appellation in France that permits varieties not solely of Vinifera origin.

At the Domaine de Jourdanet, Michel Cazade distills a few barrels worth of pure Baco a year. When our man on the ground stopped by his farm last summer, Charles was especially impressed with his 1986, distilled by the itinerant distiller Roumat and aged in oak barrels purchased from the local cooper. The vintage was kept in his well-ventilated storage area for nearly thirty years, and bottled by hand in January specifically for our club members. Enjoy!

Domaine De Jourdanet 1986 Bas Armagnac

  • Brand: Michel Cazade
  • Availability: In Stock
  • Quantity Available: 18
  • SKU #: 2781
  • $154.99